Tag Archives: Hold Everything

Virtual Office News.  Paddington’s Journey Home from Peru to London.

 

My Marmalade Challenge..

If anyone read my last blog, it was quite the solitary adventure, but I really didn’t know what was in store for me over the next week. I’m happy to report that I am now safe and home with my family back in the UK. The last week abroad was one of the most mentally challenging times I have faced for several reasons, which I will explain.

My last blog explained how I ended up in lock-down in Cusco, Peru.  Now I will expand on the last week there and how I was repatriated home. As for most people in the world, the days were blurring into each other and life was continuing. I was still stuck in the hotel and continuing to try and find sanity through socialising with the other guests in the hotel and doing many laps around the courtyard to get those steps in.

Everything took a major turn when one day I was sitting in the courtyard discussing how bored I was. I thought I would do something about this and print off some cards to play. Whilst doing this a member of staff came up to me and the other guests saying that there was a suspected case of COVID-19. Due to this we would have to immediately go to our rooms and not leave. We would have food delivered and someone would come to update us later on.

By the time I went to collect my stuff everyone was gone. I went up to my room, not really sure what to make of this new situation. I wasn’t freaking out just yet as I didn’t know completely what was going on. I continued talking to some friends online when I looked out of my window, which had a view of the hotel’s courtyard, and saw four to six people in full hazmat suits disinfecting the courtyard. It honestly looked like the scene from Monsters Inc when one of the monsters gets a sock on it and all those disinfector monsters come out. Everything else I had experienced up until now did feel like I was watching some weird sci-fi movie, but this was the first time I really felt like I was living it and not just watching it.

Still unsure what to make of the whole new situation and with some very stressed parents at the end of the phone, some of the people in the hotel had made a WhatsApp group where we discussed what was going on. It wasn’t long from being stuck in my room that I heard the horrible news that the suspected COVID-19 patient from our hotel had passed away.

This is the point where I completely freaked out and didn’t know what to do. I remained calm whilst talking to my friend but completely lost it when speaking to my Dad over the phone, trying to get him to break the news slowly to my Mum, as I knew she wouldn’t be as calm on the phone. The next two days were genuinely some of the worst I experienced. Not in the sense of what I had to do whilst being stuck inside, but mentally, was completely draining.

On one side I was extremely sad about the guy in my hotel and really felt bad for that whole situation that the hotel was in, as everyone, including the staff were now quarantined in here together. On the other side, more selfishly I was extremely concerned for myself and my safety as suddenly the one place I had to be safe was now the most high-risk area in all of Cusco.

Mental exhaustion sets in..

After two days I was mentally exhausted but had calmed down and just focused on talking to family and friends and getting through this ordeal. I was being fed well and I had people come to the door who I gave my rubbish to and who gave me toiletries and clean towels.

I think considering the whole situation I was keeping vague sanity because at the end of the day I was not the only person going through a weird situation, most of the world was, which was weirdly comforting at a time like this. After what felt like many days, there were rumours circulating that there was going to be a plane to come and save us. There had been several tweets from the embassy hinting at potential repatriation and were all just waiting for that special email to come through to our inbox.

The WhatsApp chat with many people in the hotel had everyone discussing when or if they had any potential flights out. People were slowly leaving in drips and drabs but there had been some problems with getting people out due to the high-risk hotel I was in.

We had a group of doctors come to visit us whilst the hotel had a major disinfecting effort with more people in Monsters Inc suits. It was quite a mixed reaction from everyone, but we all listened to what they had to say and then had inspections of our temperatures and oxygen saturation levels. Amusingly one of the hotel guests spoke Spanish and English so became the translator mediator between the hotel guests and doctors, and hence had to sit in on all our individual evaluations, which made for amusing awkward conversations for him to translate. The day the doctors came we were all forced outside our rooms for most of the day whilst the hotel was disinfected.  It was nice to get sunlight and properly chat to everyone even though we were wearing masks.

The biggest hurdle to come at us next was to be able to leave the hotel if we got a repatriation flight home. Due to the hotel being high-risk, the road the building was located in was behind a police line and no one was able to just walk out. We needed the doctors to come and give us documentation to show to the police that we were ok to leave and make our way to the airport. A few guests did initially have issues leaving as the doctors wouldn’t give them permission. The next day they were able to leave with the right paperwork, but it was extremely disheartening to see them go to the door and be turned away from their potential flight.

The hotel told us that the moment we heard about a flight home we would have to tell them so they could ring the doctor and they could come immediately to give us the all clear. The issue was that the doctor would never pick up the call or would take a long time to. Problems arose when you get the email late in the evening telling you to meet at the airport very early the next morning, giving no opportunity for the doctors to come.

After what felt like a VERY LONG TIME I did get my email. I was ecstatic, along with some very relieved parents. I went to the front desk to ask for the doctor as I was leaving at 6am the next morning and it was already around 5:30pm. After quite a few hours of waiting no doctor turned up. I called the front desk who reported to me that the doctor will meet us at the meeting point and that the police should let us through. This had gone against everything they had told us at the time, but I wasn’t going to question it.

A moment of anxiety

I woke up after little sleep with great anxiety about the day ahead. I met the two other Brits who I had become quite friendly with after all this time. We were all feeling quite nervous. A staff member came to meet us and let us out of the building, but only after a good spray of disinfectant all over us. The police by the hotel didn’t bother us and we left the police line behind.

I definitely felt quite emotional leaving and walking outside. It was an odd sensation seeing Brits all walking the street early in the morning, like some kind of exodus. We walked to the meeting point and there must’ve been around 200-300 people all there in masks and most of us in gloves too. After being so long in isolation suddenly being in a big group felt very wrong. There was a big British flag indicating the meeting point and many coaches to take us to the airport to start to make the long journey home.

We reached the airport long before it opened to ensure everything ran smoothly. We queued outside the gates, all trying to keep to one floor-tile per person in a vague attempt at social distancing. As time passed more countries turned up and queued too. We saw other people from our hotel who had also left, which was great to see.

After around two hours it was finally time to pass the gates into the entrance of the airport. Everyone got their temperatures checked by an official in a hazmat suit. The only word I can describe the whole airport experience was rather apocalyptic. The mood wasn’t sad as everyone was pleased to be leaving but everyone was rather quiet on the whole. We formed lines that snaked outside for check-in and eventually reached the front desk where we were handed a ticket for a flight to Lima.

For security the line was again formed from outside and snaked its way in. Once through security it was directly onto the plane. Nothing was open, unsurprisingly, to have a browse. When getting on the flight it was a sit-anywhere situation. We waited a while for everyone to get on the flight and then it was time to leave. I was quite emotional looking at the window during the flight, thinking about the past few days and leaving behind what I thought was going to be a long time travelling. I think I was also experiencing a lot of relief on that first flight and knowing I would at least be home to deal with this unworldly situation.

It was a strange site flying over Lima, you could just see very empty roads, excluding some lorries and trucks. Maybe it was because I was looking for the weirdness, but I really felt like you could tell how quiet it was from up there. When landing I could see two British Airways flights waiting on the tarmac for us. It felt very patriotic seeing the BA planes, kind of amusingly so. We had to wait a while on the smaller plane before being escorted on a bus towards the big plane for the long flight home. We never went inside Lima airport, simply taken from one flight to the next. All of our luggage was laid out on the floor and after getting off the bus we had to indicate to staff which was ours before getting on the larger plane.

It was a sit anywhere situation again, although they tried to get us to fill up from the back. The staff were all very helpful and friendly with the pilot walking through to chat and even the UK ambassador popping in on the speaker to say a few words. As with most of the day we had to wait a few hours before leaving as we had to wait for other groups of people to make it on this larger plane from around the country, and we were one of the first groups to arrive.

Whilst waiting on this plane I did see the other one take-off towards home which was exciting to see. After quite a few hours of being close together people had let down their guards a bit and started to remove masks and gloves as considering you are going to be on a 12-hour flight together it’s not going to make a huge difference. The flight itself was rather normal, maybe with less staff and not the normal hot food. Other than that the entertainment worked and we were given mini-meals, which is all I could ask for.

Up, up and away..

The flight went quick and when we landed, we did give a little cheer. I’m not usually one for clapping when the plane lands, but for this experience I was all for it. We landed in Terminal 5, Heathrow which was a much more normal experience compared to Cusco and Lima Airport. Much less masks and hazmat suits. Heathrow was oddly quiet, with us as the only flight at the baggage hall but it wasn’t the weirdest of experiences compared to the last few days.

I met my dad at the airport which was one of the best sights to see. It felt nice to be home, and not too strange. The roads were quiet, but nothing completely crazy. It was heart-warming to see the NHS signs. The best thing of all though was to see my dog’s amazing reaction to be being home. My dog’s reaction was definitely worth and much better than my family as my mum wasn’t sure whether to touch me or not, which was quite amusing. After a half-hearted hug she immediately sent me to the shower, which I guess was fair enough.

I’ve now been back for 2 weeks. The first week I really felt out of my own body and didn’t feel like I was home. I’ve now started to come into my self this week, actually leaving the house for dog walks and attempting some form of exercise when I can bring myself to. I feel much more myself this week, which is great. Being home is definitely the best thing in this weird time, spending lots of time with family and pets isn’t so bad compared to a confined room in a foreign country.

I completely understand I didn’t have it bad compared to others, I know there are still people stuck abroad who are hopefully on their way out soon. I’m also aware that I’m lucky that I made it home quite simply in the end, even if it did take a while. Just thought it would be interesting to share this completely crazy situation, as I don’t think I will ever experience anything quite like it again.

Hope everyone is keeping safe and doing well.

How to Get New Hires Up and Running Smoothly.

recruitment and onboarding

onboarding staff

I am sure we all remember the first few days and weeks at a new job.  You wander in in the morning and you feel insecure and a bit lost.  Every company, however small, has its customs and its way of doing things.  Some of this might be detailed in bumf given you by human resources but a lot you have to learn ‘on the job’.  management consultants and business gurus have realised that if a new hire is ‘onboarded’ in a haphazard manner they are more likely to vanish quite quickly wasting all the time, money and energy to recruit them in the first place.  So it is obvious to pay attention to tips and tricks that help a new employee become part of the team and forge a long relationship with your company.

Visit the Local Cafe Nero Together

We live in a vibrant coffee culture and we are surrounded by chains of friendly, inviting coffee shops.  During a new hire’s first few weeks with your company,try to have them go for coffee with their new colleagues. This works especially well with SME’s, where relationships are vital. Relaxing with a coffee away from the office setting helps to take some stress off, letting a new employee chat freely and get to know your staff in a low-pressure setting.

Get the Team Together Early On.

Once a new employee has gone through standard  orientation sessions and completed obligatory paperwork you should sit them down with different teams so that each member can introduce themselves and explain how they contribute.  This is a handy strategy in organisations with inter-relating work groups.New employees can simultaneously know who is who and gain an understanding of how each group works internally, as well as the overall function of the business.

Break Bread and Do Some Small Talk

employees chat oiver lunch

 

Lunch can be a very bonding personnel experience.  Outside from the workplace a new employee can open up about their ideas and their aspirations.  Management can also gauge how staff are likely to operate together smoothly and maybe even iron out some possible problems areas before they arise.   In a sales environment where a new employee is going to be socialising with clients and prospects it is useful to check that they handle themselves comfortably in restaurant or bar environments.  Here at Hold Everything we deal a lot with sales people who are out on the road meeting customers and being the face of the company they represent.

Invest in Company Gifts

Give new employees something that they can associate with their new company, maybe some sort of gear or clothing that features company branding. If there’s a special laptop case or coffee mug that all employees use, make sure the new guy gets it. A cheap company ballpoint won’t cut the mustard.  you want something that they will be proud to use and display . You don’t need to go the whole hog and give a company branded Rolex like many Arab state  rulers do to their entourage but a mid-range company branded wallet would be perfect.

Introduce them to the ‘head honcho’

Onboarding should come from the top down.. Arrange for the CEO to meet with the new employee and welcome them personally to the company.  Then, when someone asks them if they ever met the boss they can answer in the affirmative and give a more positive spin to the corporation.

Give them some immediate goals

Don’t put off too long before letting recruits get started in their new jobs. Give new team members some actual projects to work on and targets to meet. It doesn’t matter if these are smaller projects or part of a training program, new recruits will feel more active and productive if they have something concrete to do from the first day. It will also let you evaluate a new hire early on so that you can make any necessary adjustments to their business skills and methods.

If you put some work into your onboarding process you will benefit by not losing valuable staff through neglect.   Being part of a team is very important to keeping staff working well within the family.  In towns like London where there is intense competition to recruit the best staff it is in your best interest to let them see they have a great future amongst a welcoming and helpful team.   This is even more important when staff are often working at distance for much of the time either at home or at a virtual office. So the start of their involvement with company is crucial.

 

 

Use Your Empathy to Help Lead a Successful Team

There is something very ominous about the word ‘boss’.  It evokes the concept of bullying and hassling staff.  When we say ‘he bosses you around’ you think of an executive who has poor man-management skills and relies on brute management force to move his team onwards.   A recent article I read by John Monarch on ‘Entrepreneur ‘ and a similar article by Brent Barnhart very clearly set out some interesting thoughts on the best way to manage a team thoughtfully.  I will mention some of their excellent ideas.

Avoid ‘hustling’ 24/7 and be more chilled. Constantly working long hours without a break, he says, isn’t a recipe for success. It’s a recipe for burnout. Motivational and Youtube videos constantly advise young entrepreneurs and executives to work 14 hours a day and “hustle” every minute of every hour. That’s probably the worst possible advice to give someone in a leadership position.

Treat the team as you would like to be treated.  this makes sense and has a biblical ring to it.  Basically the suggestion is by nice to your team ands they will respond in a positive way.  the reasoning being  that a tough job always presents its own issues for workers. Why would you compound those issues by spreading negativity and treating people poorly?

Choose your management wisely.  This makes good sense.  Just being in a job a certain amount of time doesn’t mean you should automatically be promoted. You might have already have reached your personal level of competence. The truth is, some people are really great at specific roles, but their ceiling is lower because they aren’t great leaders.

Keep your expectations realistic.  To be a good leader and manager, you also need to understand the work your team is doing. If you don’t think you have a solid grasp on what your employees do, then start learning. Part of being an effective leader is always looking for new subjects or concepts to learn about.

Open channels for cross-company communication. Whether it’s among one team or between groups, you have to provide people with channels for strong communication if you want your business to operate efficiently.Exercising empathy for coworkers means not only being a good listener but also asking the right questions to get to the root of your colleagues’ problems.When you ask thoughtful questions of your coworkers, you’re basically saying, “Okay, I hear you. What can I do to help? How are we going to take care of this?”Questions asked of your employees should be specific rather a blanket, one-size-fits-all response. Workers deserve to have their concerns heard and understood.That said, sometimes the wants of our workers aren’t always clear. In the case that someone sends you a vague or otherwise confusing query, here’s a quick script you can use to help get to the core of their problem ASAP

 Give your coworkers the benefit of the doubt before passing judgment on their behaviour in the office.Let’s say a new hire is having trouble adhering to a particular policy. You could assume that they’re being negligent or otherwise aloof, but chances are they’re simply adjusting to a new way of thinking. Both adopting and breaking away from workplace rituals takes time and you should respect that.This goes without saying, but don’t automatically assume the worst of people. Maybe that coworker who’s become increasingly needy is having a tough time at home.Workplace stress comes in all shapes and sizes. Practicing patience with your coworkers is key to demonstrating empathy in the workplace.

This is the essence of the empathy argument and  I think it open some interesting points for consideration.  If you are scaling a startup it is very important to engender some sort of corporate spirit and that is best done by treating staff wisely and communicating effectively.  This style of management is particularly important when you are dealing ‘at distance’ from your team and maybe working out from a virtual office environment. I any case the maxim ‘do unto others…’ makes sense in business as it does in life.

5 Helpful Rules for Budding Entrepreneurs

When you come into contact with aspiring entrepreneurs every day of your working life as we do running a virtual office in Central London we notice that certain qualities mark out business success.   My own thoughts and observations are well reflected in a recent article by Cheryl Snapp Conner who writes regularly on business development.  She identifies 6 important qualities to develop when you are building your business.

1. Add value first — and always.

Regardless of the obstacles in consulting and business, this rule is akin to the laws of gravity and physics. Be as interested and devoted to your client’s successes as you are to your own. When this is the case, there’s no need to talk about your hero stories or the ego numbers you’ve reached. Every contact should begin and ends with the thought, “What kind of massively important difference can I make for my clients today?” There’s no need to hard sell.

2. Put Your Brain in Gear Before You Speak.

And then think again. This is interesting in that some entrepreneurs, leaders and even elected officials (think Trump or Boris Johnson) suffer from the chronic impulse to fill the air with words before their brains have fully engaged.  whoSome are living by the motto that “if you’re brazen enough when you say it, it’s true.”

3. Creative Thinking is Essential.

In business and life, beware of the parties who declare “this is how it has to be done.” There are myriad paths to success. What can you add, subtract or tweak to get a situation to work? What would turn it into magic? If option A and option B are both untenable, don’t settle. Continue to think and strategize on ideas about what will work instead of bemoaning what can’t — or what didn’t.

4. Be Clear and to the Point.

Brevity is a virtue in our harried business and personal worlds. We all know the person we unconsciously flee or avoid calling because we know the conversation will never be short. In selling, planning, and every aspect of a business, distill your message to its essence. When you can tell it in a single breath or while standing on one foot, you are probably there. Make the details of your proposal easy to find and verify, but don’t feel the need to overwhelm your listeners. Think about whetting their appetites enough that they come to you, asking for more. This is where you succeed.

5. Gratitude is a Powerful Ingredient.

It’s easy to get overwhelmed about everything that goes wrong in the world of business. Taxes rise, systems fail and rush hour traffic is worse by the day. Health concerns and stress put us all to the test. But imagine the power of stopping at least twice a day to consider at least three things you are intensely grateful for. Family relationships. Seasonal colors or scents or the clothes you love wearing, Your company’s strategy and the customers and clients you serve. Imagine the power you’d instill if you showed gratitude to your employees every day.

We would also add some guiding principles of our own.  The fact that every budding entrepreneur needs expert support in their office to free their minds from the mundane so that they can pursue loftier business ideals.  Having someone answer your phone and pass on messages correctly can be crucially important.  Knowing that business mail is attended to in a timely and secure manner is vital even in our ‘paperless age’.  This is why so many of our clients at Hold Everything build and maintain successful businesses in a rapidly changing business landscape.

 

3 Top Ways to Improve Your Small Business Marketing Using Psychology

 

Here at Hold Everything, our main concern has always been for the small business which is why we are enthusiastic to dispense helpful information about small business marketing. Which is why we are glad to share advice from Melinda Emerson’s site who is a recognised American guru on small business marketing ideas.

Small business marketing can be tough sometimes. As well as focusing on lead generation, you have to spend time nurturing and pushing customers through your sales funnels to create essential customer loyalty. Sometimes, you could benefit from extra strategies to give your small business marketing an edge. Using the power of psychology in your marketing will add power and potency to your marketing messages, generating more customers and ultimately, more sales for your small business. 

How to Use Psychology to Boost Your Small Business Marketing

In this article, we’ll take a look at 3 ways to use psychology to make sure your small business marketing is as powerful as possible.

The principle of reciprocity states that humans have a tendency, as well as a need, to want to give something back when they receive something. Or, put another way, people feel obligated to do something when something is done for them. This is GREAT news for your small business marketing! 

You can use the principle of reciprocity for new customer acquisition as well as nurturing existing customers by simply giving them something extra. A discount, a free coffee, a free product from your store or another free benefit. These strategies give customers extra value and the result is that they’ll be more likely to spend money or leave a review for other products or services (which boosts your brand awareness as well as sales). The principle of reciprocity is an important psychological tool for developing stronger and longer-lasting customer relationships too. It’s a win-win.

Top tip: Use your ‘gift’ to make customers feel unique and valued. Achieve this by using demographic insight or use existing customer data to send individualised rewards to each customer. 

2. Social Proof: Get Those Reviews

Think about it, when you see a long line at a store or restaurant, you immediately want to join it, don’t you? In your mind, something must be worth having at that business because so many other people are waiting to get in. That’s social proof- the psychological theory that says we all want to have or do what everyone else is just because they are. This is a really powerful marketing tool for any small business. 

You can capitalise on social proof in your small business marketing by building strong social media profiles on platforms such as Instagram or gathering great reviews on Yelp or TripAdvisor. For your customers, seeing how other people have visited, interacted with, or purchased from your business will make them want to do so as well; it’s kind of like FOMO (fear of missing out) for small business marketing. Taking the time to constantly boost your social proof by asking for user-generated content or customer reviews will really pay off, so don’t skimp on it.

Top tip: Make getting those essential reviews easier by automating your review request process via email or push SMS. Making it as easy as possible for every customer will increase your social proof, leading to more reviews and more customers.

3. Halo-Effect: Supercharge Brand Awareness

Every small business knows that for customer sales and new leads, brand awareness is essential. But the halo-effect takes brand awareness to the next level

The halo-effect is the tendency for positive associations of a person, brand or company in one area to influence positive associations for other areas too. For any small business, this amplification of brand values is a marketing goldmine. 

Use social media platforms to continually promote your brand reputation to customers and followers. Include case studies, testimonials and ask for user-generated content on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat to consistently share what makes your brand or business great. 

Top tip: Your customer stories and experiences are essential for boosting your halo-effect. Make asking for reviews and user-generated testimonials a clear priority, highlighting every single time your small business does something great.

Psychology Can Amplify Small Business Marketing

Small business marketing is constantly developing. Small businesses need to create stand-out marketing campaigns that not only create new customer leads, but that also help generate lasting customer loyalty too. From the principle of reciprocity to the halo-effect, your small business marketing will benefit from utilising psychology and the tendencies of human nature to amplify your message and reach. Your marketing will be more powerful and cost-efficient, helping to make sure your small business is a lasting success.

Remember, the team at Hold Everything are waiting to help you expand your small business projects by giving you the support of a prestigious London office base and a helful secretarial team to answer your phone and forward your mail.